Posts

The Benefits of Working Remotely from a Number8 Developer

This week on the blog, one of our very own developers turned team leaders, Max Madrigal shares his experience with working remotely.

Having joined the Number8 team in 2013, Max worked as a developer for 3 years. During that time he was given the opportunity to grow into a leadership role, and as a result has been a team lead for nearly 4 years now.

How did Max know he wanted to work remotely?

“After trying to have my own company in Costa Rica, I realized I wanted a job that could offer me a similar lifestyle to that of an entrepreneur. Though running my own company didn’t work out, the experience really taught me how to manage my own time.”

With the help of a few referrals, Max came aboard Number8.

“The recruiters at Number8 really helped me hone my English language skills. They saw something in me and took the time to pair me with the right customer.”

Everyday Madrigal enjoys the diversity of working remotely.

“I get to interact with people from all different backgrounds, and often in many different parts of the world.” And even though he often works from home or in an internet cafe, everyday is different. “I’m always meeting new people and doing new things; whether it’s researching solutions or developing new tech.”

Max is in charge of two development teams. 

As team lead, Max is tasked with reviewing their progress, coordinating meetings with the customer, as well as helping his team solve issues as they arise. “Often we work in the time zone of the user so we can have meetings with them.”

One of the many benefits of working remotely for Max has been the ability to travel.

Hungary, Colombia, Guatemala, Chicago, Argentina, Chile, Panama and Honduras are among the many places Madrigal has checked off his bucket list. He also spent 5 months in Europe exploring Germany, London, Venice, France and Norway, where he was able to see the northern lights. “There’s just nothing you can really compare that with.”

Throughout his travels, Madrigal was able to keep working without a beat.

During his free time, he has trained for and participated in 3 marathons. “I would get up at 5am and train for an hour, come home to shower and eat breakfast, and then work until disconnecting at 5pm.”

While working remotely usually comes with the misconception of always having to be on the clock, for Max it has been nothing short of a freeing experience.

“The support has been amazing. I have been able to communicate with the customer and manage my own time without any restrictions.” Depending on the day, Max often travels to his parent’s town to be with them or his brother’s family as well as friends within his local area.

When his nephew Sebastian was diagnosed with cancer last year, his brother’s family was forced to move to Costa Rica and then Argentina in order to receive the proper treatment. “It was a really hard time for the whole family. However, I was able to make the transition with my brother and sister-in law. I had the ability to go to the hospital and work around their needs. This really made the difference during a time period that would have otherwise made it difficult for the family to support themselves while getting the right treatment.” Sebastian has now recovered from the tumor, has his vision and is a healthy and happy boy enjoying his sister. “I am more than grateful for having the opportunity to stay extremely close to family.”

At Number 8, we help companies connect with qualified remote employees to help with software development. We also focus on helping companies improve their internal IT processes. If you’re interested in learning more about Number8 and what we do, give us a call at (502) 890-7665, or check out our information page here!

 

Costa Rica Students Responsible For Two Impressive Innovations

Students hailing from the University of Costa Rica (UCR) have recently developed two important and innovative prototypes. Each of these inventions could have long lasting, positive effects for those in and outside of the Central American country.

Here are the two latest innovations from students out of Costa Rica: 

The Argot App

Seven students in the Business Management program at the Paraíso campus of UCR developed a sign language app. The app named “Argot,” translates the Costa Rican sign language commonly  known as “Lesco.” By using the camera on a smartphone, the app is able to pick up on the signs made by a deaf person, and can then translate the hand movements into the Spanish written language in real time. The app also works vise versa in that written language can be turned into sign using an animated figure.

Argot won the University’s annual entrepreneurship fair last July. While it is now just a prototype, the students plan to put their monetary winnings towards the development of the app. The result is a big step forward in terms of inclusion, as those who are deaf in Costa Rica will now be able to better communicate within their communities. Additionally, the student’s hope is that the country as a whole will have a better understanding of the language of sign.

Apati-Dent Mouthwash

The second innovation is a regenerative mouthwash. The mouthwash was created by five students from the Pharmacy Faculty at UCR during their “Innovation Management” class. Dubbed “Apati-Dent,” this mouthwash not only freshens breath but whitens teeth as well as repairing tooth enamel. This is quite a breakthrough when considering whiteners currently on the market. Teeth whiteners have proven to be hard on teeth by wearing down enamel in order to remove stains. As a result, the standard teeth whiteners often cause tooth sensitivity.

What Apati-Dent does differently is utilize “nanoparticles that contain the main mineral component of teeth.” By using an active ingredient in which the tooth is already made from, this mouthwash is able to strengthen teeth naturally.  Therefore, instead of causing wear and tear on tooth enamel, their product fills in places where bacteria would normally grow. While Apati-Dent is currently only available in Costa Rica, the rest of us eagerly await the product.  

At Number8 we recruit computer science students with a sense of adventure and innovative minds. We believe that studying in a top-notch university prepares you for the fast paced tech market and IT. Are you interested in learning more about our developers, or do you think you are qualified to join our team? Then give us a call at (502) 890-7665 today!

 

Blue Zones: What They Are & Where to Find Them

In 2003, journalist Dan Buettner discovered 5 places in conjunction with National Geographic, where people tend to live longer and healthier lives than those around the rest of the world. Dubbed the “Blue Zones” because of “the blue circles researchers drew to identify the first one on a map,” the inhabitants of these locations have a high average life expectancy, with large percentages of people living to be over 100.

People who live in these 5 regions do so often without the aid of medications and hindrance of chronic illness. Their longevity can be attributed to a lifestyle that includes a healthy diet, exercise and low stress levels. A sense of purpose stems from family, religion, and regular social engagement within their communities. Food is consumed fresh, and consists mostly of plant based dishes made from native vegetables, fruits, fish and nuts. Daily activity dictates that locals traverse by foot, so physical movement, sustainability and socialization come naturally.

Visit one of the 5 blue zones and you’ll find warm beachy weather and a love for nature. However, even if you never jet set from coast to coast, perhaps there is still a lot one can glean in the hopes of pursuing a better life style. 

The 5 Blue Zones

  • Sardinia, Italy

    • The first zone to ever be identified, Sardinia is home to the biggest population of male centenarians in the world. Due to it’s geographical isolation, genes have been passed down from generation to generation containing the M26 marker. This M26 marker has been linked to a longer life span. 
  • Okinawa, Japan

    • Okinawa makes up the south pacific islands of Japan. Here the women happen to live longer than other females across the globe. They value support groups, or what they call “moai” a lifelong group of peers there to help you through life’s struggles. They also work hard to develop “ikigai” or a reason for being that helps center, motivate, and fulfill them. 
  • Loma Linda, California

    • The only zone within the U.S., Loma Linda is a city in San Bernardino County, California. The Seventh-day Adventist Church (a Protestant Christian denomination) is prominent in the community. Those that reside here outlive their fellow Americans by a full decade. This is possibly due to a strict adherence to the Sabbath (a day of rest), the fact that their health is central to their faith, and that they don’t partake in tobacco or alcohol use. 
  •  Nicoya, Costa Rica

    • Located on Costa Rica’s pasific coast, this Latin American paradise has a thriving healthcare system and economy.  The locals have what they call a “plan de vida” or life plan that provides them with a purpose and enables their elders to continue to seek an active life.  
  • Ikaria, Greek

    • Ikaria is an island in the Aegean Sea known for it’s islander’s pride and traditional values. Here it is normal to live into your 90s. The people come and go as they please, as the concept of time is less rigid than in the modern world. 

No matter where your company calls home, Number8 can help your business connect to top tech talent. If you want to learn more about our consulting process and why we are the perfect offshore software development company to help you reach your company’s goals, then give us a call at (502) 890-7665 today!

5 Myths of Working With an Offshore Development Team

Working with an offshore development team is becoming a popular alternative staffing solution in the software industry. Not only does it reduce operating costs, but it allows a company to build a team at their own pace. However, offshoring work comes with it’s fair share of misconceptions.

Here are a few common myths about the pitfalls of working with an offshore development team.

  1. The quality of the work will be poor.

    While trusting remote workers is reasonably hard for any employer or company to do, reputable offshore development teams have proven to help tech companies advance within the industry. As long as a partnership and relationship is established, and industry standard benchmarks are relied upon, the quality of work received will not be lacking.

  2. It takes jobs away.

    The fact of the matter is that U.S. based tech companies are facing a shortage of IT professionals. Offshoring some of the workload actually frees up current staff to work on reaching their goals. Developing the company’s end products is always more worthwhile than working on lesser routine and task oriented maintenance.

  3. It’s a security risk.

    Depending on the type of work that is being offshored, data privacy and intellectual property breaches can be a concern. Unfortunately, these security risks are just as likely to happen onshore as they are off it. Detailed contracts outlining who is liable can help curb risks and ensure everyone is compliant in terms of security needs. 

  4. We won’t be able to communicate with one another.

    In addition to the possible language barrier that comes with having offshore employees, there are also varying idioms, gestures, customs, and behavior norms that can throw communication off kilter. However, it is in no way impossible to find an offshore team that is either fluent in english, comfortable with a specific dialect, or capable of communicating through the right channel. In today’s world we are all connected online, and the agile project management method is specifically known for enabling more transparency between working partners. The idea that one cannot work in unison with those from other cultures is at most an antiquated idea as email, video chatting, and instant messaging allow for those from around the world to communicate with one another better than ever before.

  5. The time gap will mean a lag in productivity.

    In the IT world, completing projects quickly is crucial as ideas and and new technologies are always evolving. Depending on the geographical location of overseas partners, offshoring can often mean a difference in time zones and work day hours between teams. While this understandably seems worrisome, it’s important to remember there are many countries where part of the work day overlaps. Therefore collaboration can take place. If this isn’t the case, many companies make the difference in time zones work for them with round the clock support between both countries and teams.

Finding the right partners to grow your team and business is an essential ingredient for success. Why not utilize resources from around the world and open your company up to the best the industry has to offer?

At Number8, we help companies create software products with the help of offshore development. If you questions about our consulting process and why we are the right offshore software development company for your team to work with, then give us a call at (502) 890-7665 today!

Traveling to Costa Rica for Work or Pleasure – 10 Things You’ll Need to Pack

Things to Bring when Traveling to Costa ricaWhether you are traveling to Costa Rica for pleasure, business, or a combination of the two, there are some things you’ll need to pack for your trip to make things enjoyable.

One handy thing about Costa Rica is that you’ll find the same type of electric converters and plug adapters as in the U.S. so you don’t need to worry about your electrical devices and chargers.

However, there are some personal items and other things you should plan to pack. These items may either be hard to find, more expensive or even unavailable in Costa Rica. Follow along for a list of 10 things you should pack for your trip to Costa Rica.

10 Things to Pack When Traveling to Costa Rica

  1. Passport – At one time, people could travel from the U.S. to Costa Rica with a driver’s license but a passport is now necessary. It is advisable to take screen shots of your passport as well in case you were to misplace it.
  2. Other form of ID – Plan to bring a state ID, a driver’s license, or some other official form of ID with photo along with your passport. To be safe, it is advisable to separate your passport and your alternative ID.
  3. Medical insurance information. Even though Costa Rica has national medical care, it is advisable to have your insurance information easily accessible in the event of a very serious accident requiring that you leave the country for treatment.
  4. Certain personal items that you “can’t live without.” If you wear contacts and need a special cleaning solution, make sure you bring this with you to Costa Rica. If you have a favorite deoderant, shampoo, cosmetic item or toothpaste, vitamins, sunscreen or pain reliever, bring it with you. If you take any type of prescription medications, it is advisable to have these filled before your trip since you may not be able to get these in Costa Rica.
  5. English to Spanish translation book. Unless you are fluent in Spanish, you will benefit from a phrase book that will make your communication easier. People in Costa Rica tend to be very friendly and happy to engage in conversation. Don’t miss out on this opportunity.
  6. Sun protection for your eyes. Whether you wear sunglasses, a baseball cap or some other type of hat, make sure you bring this along on your trip to Costa Rica. Depending on when you visit and where you are in the country, the sun can be very intense. You’ll want to protect your skin and eyes so that you can relax and have a good visit.
  7. Some type of rain protection. Whether you bring a small umbrella or a lightweight raincoat, chances are you’ll be glad to have it during a trip to Costa Rica. If you are visiting during the rainy season, which spans from the middle of April through November, rain gear is essential.
  8. Beach towel. Chances are you’ll hit the beach during your visit to Costa Rica. And if you do, you’ll be glad to have a big beach towel to enjoy. Towels are also handy after visiting the rain forests or enjoying a day hike.
  9. Bird book. The bird life in Costa Rica is truly sensational. Whether you are serious bird lover, or a person who has never taken notice, you will be glad to have a bird guide book with you during your visit. In terms of which book to buy, there are many options including field guides that focus specifically on the birds in Costa Rica.
  10. Bandages. While it may seem silly to bring these along, you may be glad to have them. The natural beauty of the country will beckon you towards outdoor activity, and it is always handy to have some bandages in the event of a minor scuff or scrape.