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10 Agile Project Management Terms You Should Know

Whether you’re planning on managing a project the agile way, or just want to stay up to date on the latest developments in the field, here are 10 agile project management terms you should know:

1. Agile Manifesto

The agile manifesto is a great starting point for anyone looking to familiarize themselves with the agile methodology. The manifesto outlines the 4 values and 12 principles of agile software development and was actually created by a group of software developers in an effort to provide a clear and alternative set of processes for developing software. The agile way of doing things prioritizes individuals and interactions over processes and tools, working software over comprehensive documentation, customer collaboration over contract negotiation, and responding to change over following a plan. 

2. Scrum

A scrum is a daily stand up meeting with the sole focus being to review each team member’s progress on any given project. Scrums help to keep everyone accountable and on the same page, ensuring no one falls too behind or gets too far ahead in the development of a project.

3. Scrum Master

A scrum master oversees the development process and acts as a problem solver for the team; preventing roadblocks and enforcing the agile way of doing things.

4. Stakeholder

A stakeholder refers to anyone with a vested interest in the product. This can be the client, the end user, sales people, legal representatives etc. Stakeholders have an informative role in the development phase, and are critical in defining the project’s requirements.

5. Backlog

The backlog is the ever changing list of the software’s requirements. It’s not to be seen as a to do list so much as a prioritized list of desired features of the product provided by the stakeholders.

6. Story

The story tells the software system’s requirements from the consumer’s point of view. For example, as “a <type of user>, I want to <perform some task> so I can <achieve some goal.>”

7. Burndown & Burnup Charts

A burndown chart visually measures the progress of a project over time (the vertical axis is made up of the backlog while the horizontal axis represents time). A burnup chart displays completed work (the vertical axis shows the amount done over the horizontal axis, time). These charts are essential to inspiring the team as they work and help provide a realistic time frame for the project’s completion as well as a working scale of the project.

8. Feature Creep

While changes are expected, and certainly embraced in the agile way of doing things, the phrase “feature creep” refers to features that are added after development has begun. Adding too many features during the development phase can result in feature creep and software that is too complicated or difficult to use.

9. Timeboxing

Timeboxing is kind of like time blocking in that it assigns a specific time frame to accomplish a goal. The definitive feature of timeboxing however, is that the work stops at the end of the timebox, instead of when the work is complete. This is extremely helpful in terms of productivity, and controlling the scale of a project.

10. Sprint

A sprint is a short development phase usually lasting anywhere from 1 week to a month. Sprints help prevent projects from feeling overwhelming and allows feedback to be given at appropriate junctures.

At Number8, we help project managers connect with highly trained and efficient IT support to help reach company goals. If you’re interested in learning more about Number8 and what we do, give us a call at(502) 890-7665, or check out our information page!

Working Remotely? Try These 3 Things To Cultivate Work Community

Working remotely can present many challenges, everything from resisting the urge to fire up a movie and veg out, to feeling that creeping sense of isolation that comes from sitting alone behind the screen. As a company who promotes remote work opportunities, we’ve identified several ways to cultivate a thriving work community. Below are three tips that should keep your presence so embedded in the office, your coworkers will swear they hear your keyboard clicking away beside them even when you aren’t there.

3 Tips to Cultivate Work Community While Working Remotely

Tip #1: Be open to feedback.

One of the most important parts of forming any close-knit relationship is trust. The person on the other side of that monitor is most likely depending on you to complete a task. To your coworker, they’re placing a lot of trust in someone they can’t see. Put their mind at ease by telling them upfront that you’re open to feedback and willing to work through things. Making this clear initially will help them understand you share the same goal and will make them feel more comfortable as you continue to work together. Build trust by responding to feedback graciously. Every smooth interaction makes way for future smooth interactions.

Tip #2: Be humble.

If there’s one thing we all have in common, it’s our tendency to overthink things. When you work remotely, it’s easy to convince yourself that it only happens to you. Fear that you’re alone with your thoughts, and pride in your ability to handle things on your own can be a deadly combination that results in isolation! Instead, be humble and reach out to your coworkers with any questions or concerns you have. This goes a long way to cultivate trust. Your coworkers will feel more connected with you when you’re open with them, and in turn, they will be more likely to reach out to you when they have questions of their own. Once you realize you have friends ‘on the inside’ you’ll find it easier to tune out that inner voice that tells you you’re on your own. Remember that you’re in it together.

Tip #3: Get social.

In this age of social media, it’s easier than ever to connect. Find a few coworkers you feel comfortable with and send them a friend request immediately. Becoming connected on social media offers you and your coworkers the chance to put a face to the name that pops up in the inbox every day. Getting to know each other better in this casual manner strengthens your bond and your understanding of one another as you continue to work together professionally.

BONUS TIP: Live that meme and emoji life. A true favorite! There is great power in a well-placed meme or emoji when communicating with a coworker. Not only do they lighten the mood, but they also offer visual cues to help people understand your tone and intention, which is a wonderful thing in the absence of body language, facial expressions, and tone of voice.

At Number8, we provide high quality technical talent to businesses of all sizes and sectors. We specialize in application development, custom software, website development, mobile solutions, database design, client/server, web application development and Q/A testing. Learn more about what we do and how to get started with Number8 by calling 502-890-7665 today!

5 Things You May Not Know About Jeff Bezos

Amazon is the leader of e-commerce as we know it, and no doubt a household name. It’s CEO and founder Jeff Bezos however, has just recently begun to make headlines.

The richest person in the world, Bezos is said to have a net worth of 112 billion. After graduating from Princeton with degrees in electrical engineering and computer science, he worked for an investment bank. In 1994 he launched Amazon out of his garage. What would become a multi-national tech company began as a virtual bookstore. Bezos sold his first book in 1995, a copy of Douglas Hofstadter’s Fluid Concepts and Creative Analogies: Computer Models of the Fundamental Mechanisms of Thought.

Amazon has since grown to develop and offer many products and services ranging from the Kindle, movies and television shows under Amazon Studios, as well as the cloud-computing service known as Amazon Web Services. As a result, Amazon has catapulted Bezos into the spotlight. For those interested in learning more about the serial entrepreneur, here are 5 things you may not know about Jeff Bezos:

1. He originally wanted to name Amazon “Cadabra.”

As in “abracadabra.” Bezos wanted to convey something magical about the convenience of shopping online. However, his advisers convinced him otherwise. Bezos instead chose the name Amazon because it began with the first letter of the alphabet. It also represented the earth’s largest river and he was aiming for opening the world’s largest bookstore.

2. Bezos owns The Washington Post.

The tech savvy entrepreneur purchased the newspaper in October of 2013 for $250 million after being approached by publisher Donald Graham. Under Bezos’s leadership the paper has adapted to the digital age. After reinventing itself as a media company, it has doubled it’s web traffic and even turned a profit. No small feat in today’s world of online journalism.

3. He owns a private space company.

In 2000, Bezos founded the aerospace company Blue Origin. The space flight operator is supposedly launching a crewed space tourism flight before the end of this year. Bezos’s long-term goal is to eventually aid in the colonization of space. The company is the first to invent reusable rockets. No other rocket in the history of spacecraft has been used twice. The ability to successfully launch and land a rocket multiple times will help to significantly lower the cost of access to space.

4. He’s a huge Star Trek Fan.

Bezos has reportably admitted that both the smart speaker Amazon Echo and it’s virtual assistant Alexa were inspired from the Star Trek computer. In 2016, he begged Paramount to let him have a cameo in the movie Star Trek Beyond. While his scene only lasted 8 seconds, he did have a speaking part.

5. Bezos makes $2,489 per second.

According to Business Insider, “Bezos makes more than twice what the median US worker makes in one week. That’s $149,353 per minute.” He is also “nearly 38% richer than the British monarchy.” And to think he once was a McDonald’s fry cook…

 

The Secret Hollywood History Behind WiFi

WiFi has become essential to our professional and personal lives. It has changed the way we communicate and altered the way many of our devices work (thanks to the Internet of Things). While it’s now nearly effortless for us to install, connect to and use, how did it come to be?

While WiFi wasn’t accessible to consumers until 1997, it has a long history dating back to the 1940’s. At it’s core, WiFi uses wireless transmitters and radio signals to exchange information and connect to the internet. In the 1940’s, Hollywood starlet Hedy Lamarr and composer George Antheil developed the radio frequency hopping technology that would become the foundation for the wireless communication we all enjoy today.

The History of Radio Frequency Hopping

According to a recent documentary, ‘Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story,’ the popular actress Hedy Lamarr often ran experiments in her trailer between takes. Upon meeting Antheil, who famously synchronized pianos to hop from one note to another, the pair came up with a plan that incorporated radio signals. At the time of their work together, World War 2 was in full swing and the U.S. Navy needed a way to protect their underwater missiles form Nazis detection.

Together, Lamarr and Antheil joined the war effort by inventing the concept of radio frequency hopping. Their invention used perforated rolls of paper, much like the ones in pianos, to change frequencies from one point to another via the holes in the roll. This discovery helped guide radio-controlled missiles underwater without risking enemy exposure in that both the radio transmitter and the receiver could simultaneously change from frequency to frequency.

Modern Wireless Communication Methods

Fast forward to 1985, when the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) allowed several bands of wireless spectrum to be used without a government licence, and communication via radio frequency energy became revolutionized. In order to operate on these bands, devices were required to steer around interference from other equipment. They did so using the frequency hopping technology developed by Lamarr and Antheil.

While the duo were granted US Patent No. 2,292,387  in 1942, they signed it over to the Navy during the war. It wasn’t until 1997 that they were recognized for their frequency hopping technology by the Electronic Frontier Foundation. It is no doubt that WiFi’s many applications, including gps and bluetooth wouldn’t be possible without Lamarr’s and Antheil’s invention. As the technological wonder continues to evolve and become faster and more reliable, we can take more than our fair share of inspiration from it’s unlikely source..

How to Develop the Digital Skills Necessary for Remote Work

Remote work can offer an employee the flexibility needed to be a caregiver, world traveler or student; making it an ideal form of work for most of the population. For an older employee however, the idea of working from home can seem overwhelming and fraught with technological difficulties.

Luckily, many of the skills needed to succeed in the office translate quite easily to working from home. Time management, self-sufficiency, communication and teamwork for example are all key remote work skills. And chances are, anyone whose had office experience, is familiar with a computer. However, there is a level of tech savviness required to operate out of the office full time.

For those looking to make the transition to remote work for the first time, but are afraid of getting left behind in this new digital age, here are some of the most popular web applications to get up to speed on before you apply for the job.

It’s worth noting that many of these applications have free tutorials, videos, and training available as well as free versions to help you get your feet wet.

File Storage & Sharing Platforms

When you’re working on the go, you can’t be tied down to your desktop. Instead it’s common for remote workers to operate exclusively from online or cloud based platforms such as Google Drive, Dropbox or Apple iCloud. These make it easy to access your work files no matter where you are or what device you’re on. As long as you have the app downloaded, you can work from anywhere.

Long gone are the days of losing your work because your computer crashed. These applications automatically save and sync everything as you go. Not to mention, you can effortlessly share files with others by giving them access via a link or email address. Google even offers a full suite of applications including word documents, slide shows and spreadsheets well suited for every field of work.

Video Conferencing

Unfortunately, even remote workers can’t escape meetings. Zoom and Skype are popular video conferencing options for meeting outside of the office.  Zoom offers free video calls with up to 50 people as long as you don’t talk for more than 40 minutes and Skype is free as long as both parties are using the app. Both of these applications (and many others) offer chat options, screen sharing and recorded calls. Just make sure you’re well equipped with the right headset for the job.

Collaborative Applications

While email is everyone’s go to in-office communication platform, remote workers often utilize project management software to stay in touch virtually. Both Trello and Slack are excellent examples and offer many collaborative features for working with a team remotely. These shared applications make it easy to generate a task list and delegate the workload. They also show each member’s progress as well as what stage any given project is in and give the option to offer feedback to one another. Additionally shared calendars ensure everyone is on the same page when it comes to meetings and out of office time periods.

At Number8, we provide high quality technical talent to businesses of all sizes and sectors. We specialize in application development, custom software, website development, mobile solutions, database design, client/server, web application development and Q/A testing. Learn more about what we do and how to get started with Number8 by calling 502-890-7665 today!

Reviewing Some In Demand Tech Jobs That Don’t Require Coding

It can be hard for someone who wants to get into the field of information technology to do so without any coding experience. Coding is a huge money-maker in the world of business right now as more and more companies go digital. With the increased prevalence of smartphones, portable computers, and the like, companies have to be online to remain relevant. In order to do that, companies are pouring their funds into their IT department. They’re doing this to improve their online presence and their user’s online experiences. For this reason, most job descriptions that are related to IT work require some sort of coding experience; however, there are some fields out there that are offering in-demand tech jobs that don’t require coding experience.

Most jobs in technology fall into one of three categories: developer, designer, or manager. While almost all developer job opportunities require coding, often designer or manager positions are available without any coding knowledge. This is what we’re going to be discussing today. Follow along to learn more about five in-demand tech jobs that don’t require coding experience.

Five In-Demand Tech Jobs That Don’t Require Coding Experience

1. Designer for User Interface (UI)

If you have an eye for design, and experience in programs like Photoshop, there may be an opportunity for you in UI design. While the popular UX reference to User Experience, UI refers to User Interface. User Interface is how the software looks and feels more so than how it functions. UI Designers often brainstorm and engineer the visual design of a new program or software. Then they work with a team of UI Developers to make their wireframes, storyboards, sitemaps, and user flows come to life.

2. Software Quality Assurance Tester

Before software is made available to the public, it goes through numerous rounds of testing from software quality assurance testers. This job, which requires no coding experience, requires an employee that can put an upcoming software through various rounds of different user experiences and applications with the main goal of breaking the software. By putting new software through stressful scenarios that push the software’s limits in regards to functionality and scalability, software quality assurance testers ensure that the software is at its strongest and capable of any user experience before it goes to market.

3. Search Engine Optimization (SEO) Specialist

Any company looking to launch itself into the 21st century must employ at least one Search Engine Optimization Specialist. A job opportunity as an SEO Specialist is perfect for those with a knack for analysis, research, and general knowledge of how Google works. SEO Specialists often work with a team of developers and designers to make sure that websites are using the best SEO practices they can while also researching search terms, creating keyword-rich content, optimizing web page copy, and analyzing the data collected through analytics and advertising campaigns.

4. Software Sales Associate

Any information technology or marketing company that’s creating its own software needs people to sell it. If you’re interested in learning more about information technology and have experience in sales, you may be in luck. Oftentimes there are companies out there looking for software sales associates. While entry-level pay is usually lower, with commission based bonuses incorporating big chunks of sales associate’s paychecks, the payoff can be highly rewarding for those with a knack for sales. For those who perform well in high-pressure and high-stakes situations, have the ability to learn the ins and outs of a software then translate that into why potential customers need this software for their own benefit, and can deal well with stressful situations, the position of a software sales associate may be the perfect step into the information technology field.

5. Technical Support Specialist

While there are some technical support positions that require a degree, there are others where having a college degree, or experience coding, is not an issue. There are a lot of benefits that come with being a technical support specialist. The ability to learn on the job is one while the often flexible hours offered for support specialists is another. Those who have an interest in customer service and the ability to be familiar with a variety of software and technical programs will excel in the role of a technical support specialist. Communication skills, patience, and understanding are all critical skills, but coding is not.

The information technology field may seem off-limits to those who don’t know how to code, but this is not the case. There are plenty of in-demand tech jobs that don’t require coding experience at all. And one of the best things about the IT field is that someone who may not have coding experience but has an interest in coding will have the opportunity to learn on the job. The world of information technology is always changing and growing. This expansion clears the path for employees to have internal growth within their company. Finding an entry-level job in information technology can open up doors of opportunity for those with or without coding experience.

At Number8, we employ a high number of software developers who have coding experience. But we also have job opportunities available for those with no experience in coding. Learn more about what we do and how to get started with Number8 by calling 502-890-7665 today!

The Best Cybersecurity Practices for Remote Employees

While some companies are becoming more and more open to the idea of remote employees, a lot of corporate companies still have reservations. When a company opens up to the idea of remote employees, a few things happen. People who are efficient in-house workers become interested in moving their work to a home office. And corporate starts to worry about data breaches on their remote employees’ computers. A study done by the popular company Shred-It showed that over 85% of C-Level executives thought that the risk of getting company data breached was more prevalent when employees were stationed at home. And these executives aren’t worried without cause. Data breaches affected an entire third of remote workers in the United Kingdom over the last year which has put companies at risk left and right. 

However, data breaches should not deter all companies from allowing workers to work remotely. The benefits of remote employees far outweigh the downfalls. When a company chooses to allow employees to work from home they not only open up brick and mortar space but also widen their search area when looking for qualified employees to hire. And there are ways to practice safe cybersecurity and prevent data breaches from affecting remote employees. This is what we’re talking about on our blog today, so follow along to learn more about the best safe cybersecurity practices for remote employees.

5 Essential Cybersecurity Practices Remote Employees Should Follow

When it comes down to it, once an employee is working remotely there isn’t much the company can do to protect their devices and data from being hacked. However, there are plenty of safe cybersecurity practices that employees can apply to their work routine to keep themselves, their equipment, and the company’s data secure.

1. Keep Track and Control Of All Devices

One of the main reasons that data breaches occur is because an employee loses their device that holds their work-related information. Across airports in the United States, a laptop is stolen every minute and the majority of those stolen objects are never reunited with their owners. As a remote employee, it is crucial to understand that hackers, and other cybercriminals, are keeping an eye out for the opportune moment to knick a laptop or tablet in hopes it has sensitive information on it. Therefore it is critical to keep track and have control over all your devices when in public. There are multiple ways to do this including:

  • Use the highest level of security to lock and unlock your devices. Touch IDs, 6-digit passcodes, and double factor authentication should be activated.
  • Enable the “Find My Device” feature, so if your computer, laptop, or phone is lost then it may be easier to find if it is lost or stolen.
  • Keep your phone, tablet, or computer with you at all times with no exceptions.

2. Be Careful Using Public WiFi

It can be tempting to take advantage of free WiFi in cafes, restaurants, book stores, and the like; however, it is not always a safe option. Public computers and WiFi connections are easily hackable and, if cracked, hackers can gain access to all files and stored credentials you accessed while on the computer. It is better to avoid public computers and password-free WiFi connections altogether, but if you absolutely must use it then be sure to remember the following:

  • Obscure the view of your screen as best as possible. In an ideal situation, you are able to have your back facing a wall and limited space to your sides.
  • Do not go to any websites that store sensitive information in regards to your job. This includes usernames, passwords, client information, etc.
  • Manually clear all documents you downloaded while using a public computer. This is so others cannot see what files you downloaded and access them, as well.
  • Make sure that the computer is not storing any of your login credentials permanently and restart the device after you are done using it to remove temporary files.

3. Setup and Use Encrypted Email

If you’re in a position that requires you to send sensitive information through email then email encryption is a must. 90% of email is sent as plain text which is not secure in any way and susceptible to spies and hackers. However, with email encryption, any information sent over email is scrambled. This way it is only able to be read when the recipient receives the email and decrypts it.

If you’re working from home and it’s been approved by your employer, they should be able to install email encryption software onto your remote work technology. It will ensure that your computer, tablet, and phone are more secure and their information is safe.

4. Do Not Use USBs That Have Not Been Proven Safe

It’s not uncommon for remote employees to use USB drives. Whether they are needing something from the office or need to send something to the office, USB drives help. However, USB drives from unknown sources can contain malicious software. It’s important to remember to never insert an unverified USB into your remote work computer. This even includes USB drives that you may pick up at work-related events. Risking a security breach is not worth waiting to verify the USB or get the files another way (Dropbox, Google Drive, etc.)

If you want to go further into safe cybersecurity practices, it’s also important to not let other users plug their USB drives into your computer. There is no way to know what is on their USB drives. They may or may not be aware of a malicious file. Even if you know the person, do not allow it.

5. If Any Issues Arise, Get Your Company’s IT Team Involved

If you fear that the device you use for work has been compromised, notify your company’s IT team immediately. It is so important to be aware of what a breach looks like:

  • Increasing amounts of pop-up ads and spam while you’re browsing or using programs.
  • Slowing down of the computer despite it not running a lot of programs.
  • More and more error messages when trying to perform simple tasks.
  • A change to your homepage, search engine, or browsing settings.

While the company’s IT team may not be able to save your computer, they need to know that data has been breached. This way they can take the necessary steps to further protect the company’s data and servers. It is best practice to tell your IT team everything you can about the breach. Try to remember when exactly it could have occurred, how, and why.

There are a lot of benefits to companies having remote workers. However, concerns of a cybersecurity breach can deter executives from taking the leap. By being aware of ways to prevent cybersecurity breaches through common practices, workers can further prove remote work is safe.

At Number8, we have offices in Louisville, Kentucky and Costa Rica where we employee remote workers. With the proper training, awareness, and precautions, we are able to employ remote workers without any trouble. To learn more about what we do at Number8, visit our About page. If you’re interested in learning more about Number8 and how we can help your business, contact us today.

5 Programs That Can Help You Stay Organized At Work

organized at workNo matter how organized you may be, there comes a point where you get overwhelmed at work. Whether it’s due to growing responsibilities or a surge in clientele, we all get there. Thankfully there are a lot of helpful programs available to stay organized at work. From your evergrowing to-do list to client management, there’s a program for everything. Due to being busy, you may not have the time necessary to see what programs work best for you. This is why we’ve outlined 5 programs that can help you stay organized at work. Take a look at our list below and see if any of these programs will help you stay organized and manage your workload.

Stay Organized at Work with These 5 Programs

1. Trello

Trello is a great way to manage projects and tasks within those projects. Users can set up “boards” to denote projects, so each project is a separate entity. Within each board, users can create “cards” to represent tasks and “lanes” to track progress of tasks. With an easy-to-use interface, almost anyone can use Trello to their advantage. Trello also has an app that can be used on phones or tablets and features a compatible interface. Even more beneficial are the desktop and email notifications users can set up to make sure they don’t miss anything. If you’re feeling like you’re being pulled in too many directions, try Trello. With this helpful program, you’re able to keep all your projects in one place and track their progress.

2. Tomorrow.do

Do It Tomorrow may sound like the procrastinator’s dream, but it’s not quite that. This easy to set up and even easier to use program is a quick signup away and completely free. With Do It Tomorrow, you’re able to consolidate your to-do list in one place (and even set it as the first page to open when you get to work!) The way this program works is quite interesting. First you fill up your to-do list with all your tasks. You can set tasks that need to get done today and tomorrow. Once your tasks are all in place, start marking them off as you complete them. Anything that doesn’t get done automatically gets pushed to the top of the list the next day. It’s a great little program that can really keep you focused on the task at hand and the task ahead.

3. Google Drive

If you’re aware of Gmail then you’re probably aware of Google Drive. However, what a lot of people don’t know is the limits you can push Google Drive to in order to work it to your advantage. With Google Docs, Google Sheets, Google Calendar, and Gmail, Google Drive really has everything you need to manage your work. And it all stays in one space which can be accessed from any computer, phone, or tablet. One of the best things that Google Drive offers is practically endless storage space. So, if you’re looking for a storage program that you can access from your home, office, or vacation spot and offers a wide variety of functions check out Google Drive. It’s another user-friendly platform that most office workers utilize for at least some sort of organization tool.

4. Dropbox

Dropbox is another great tool for file management and photo storage. This program has been around for quite a while and has a large following, so it’s likely you’ve received a Dropbox link from someone trying to share files or photos with you. While Dropbox is a great platform for sharing documents, photographs, and large files, the platform has memory restrictions. If you find yourself falling in love with Dropbox, you’ll need to be on top of managing what you store in it or ready to upgrade your file storage size.

5. Hootsuite

If you work with social media at all, it can get overwhelming and that can happen quickly. Almost all social media managers use some sort of online program to help stay organized. Hootsuite is one of the most popular programs for just that. Hootsuite is a social media management tool that allows users to schedule social media posts well into the future for publication. With the ability to manage Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and more from one place, Hootsuite saves users time and headache. Hootsuite, like most of the programs we’ve covered, also has a user-friendly app that can be used on phones and tablets alike. This allows you to take your social media management with you on the go and never miss a post.

While these are five tools that we’re familiar with, there are tons of other programs to help you stay organized at work available. We recommend looking around and finding the programs that work best for you. Most are free and those that don’t offer a free trial for some amount of time. Try out different programs until you find the right fit for you and your workflow. Being organized at work can help to reduce stress and increase job happiness, so find what works for you and use it to your advantage!

At Number8, we offer onshore and nearshore product development support to companies large and small. Throughout our company, we hold high regard for job happiness and find that being organized at work helps to keep our employees happy. If you are interested in learning more about what we do or getting in touch with us, visit our Contact Us page or give us a call at 502-890-7665.