Why Mistakes are an Important Part of the Creative Process Even in Tech

Those in the Information Technology field know that software development doesn’t occur in a vacuum. It’s collaborative and often times risks need to be taken in order to achieve any level of innovation. With risks come mistakes and projects that don’t always pan out as planned. However, IT teams that follow the agile methodology tend to be familiar with the ideology that mistakes are an important part of the creative process. The agile way of developing tech is adaptive in that it is designed around embracing feedback and learning opportunities. As Albert Einstein once said, “A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new.” Here’s why you shouldn’t let the fear of making a mistake keep you or your team in your comfort zone:

Mistakes let us know what doesn’t work and paves the path for what could.  

When it comes to developing something new or going into uncharted territory, mistakes are bound to happen. But with experimentation comes discovering a new way of doing something and that is almost always value added. By pivoting and testing new ideas, one is better able to evaluate and refine a product or idea and then learn from it. 

It’s not the mistake that defines an employee, but how they rebound from it.

If mistakes are inevitable, a team should know how to handle them. Take the stigma out of it, and you’ll find that enabling a team to make mistakes means also giving them the opportunity to problem solve effectively. Employees who take accountability for their mistakes and are able to learn from them are a valuable asset to any company. Instead of creating a culture of fear where one tends to get defensive if a mistake is made, establish one where everyone feels empowered enough to innovate and safeguard for the future. At Number8, we help project managers connect with highly trained and efficient IT support to help reach company goals. If you’re interested in learning more about Number8 and what we do, give us a call at (502) 890-7665, or check out our information page!

6 Reasons Why Agile Software Development Will Remain Relevant for the Foreseeable Future

Every development methodology has its pros and cons. Depending on the size and culture of a company, the structure and plan best used to oversee the process of developing a system can vary. However, it seems that as of late, the Agile Methodology is winning out as the best way of managing a both a company and software development team's resources.  Here are 6 reasons why Agile software development will continue to remain relevant, perhaps even as a management approach within other industries.

  1. It's Collaborative

    The Agile method runs around daily meetings or "scrums" that cultivate accountability and teamwork. During any given scrum, each team member shares their accomplishments from the last work day, announces what they are currently working on, and mentions any possible impediments to progress for the team to help them problem solve. These meetings keep everyone on schedule, and create a cohesive atmosphere where each person is able to work cross-functionally and continuously learn from one another.  
  2. It Offers Flexibility 

    Setbacks are common when it comes to software development. The Agile methodology's time frame offers flexibility in that it builds in time for future corrections. By embracing the ideology from the start that not everything is going to go to plan, Agile prevents errors from halting a development project by making time for them. 
  3. It Promotes Efficiency 

    With this flexibility comes a sense of urgency because of the level of communication that exists within Agile. Problems are tended to efficiency because of the cyclical like feedback and level of interaction between all team members. The speed at which corrections are made is key in that they save time and resources; allowing a company to stay within budget.  
  4. It's Adaptive

    As it's adaptive in nature, Agile welcomes changes in requirements and feedback. This way of thinking is value adding as it encourages innovation and risk taking at every stage of the process. 
  5. It Tests for Quality

    The focus of agile is test driven. Software is developed in a way that continuously tests for quality. Problems are identified early on in order to achieve the best possible end product.  
  6. It Offers Transparency

    Agile is inherently transparent. Therefore, stakeholders and product owners can ensure a proper return on their investment. Additionally, the customer, developer and project manager remain on the same page and achieve a desired level of communication. 
At Number8, our philosophy is to empower our clients to produce better software, faster. We are experts in augmenting scrum teams with senior consultants that can help increase team velocity immediately. If you’re interested in learning more about Number8 and what we do, give us a call at (502) 890-7665, or check out our information page.  

An Overview of Scrum Certification

What is Scrum?

The term “scrum” is borrowed from the team contact sport rugby. In rugby, everyone has to work together for the duration of the game. Applied to the world of information technology, scrum’s holistic approach assures that no one is left behind or too far ahead during a project. In fact, development teams that utilize scrum, lead daily meetings or “scrums” to ensure everyone is on the same page. During these, team members give status reports on progress made for their specific project. Though the concept of scrum predates the Agile way of thinking, it is a subset of the Agile methodology in that it is a development methodology that supports a more cyclical, flexible and adaptive way of working through a software development cycle. A typical scrum team consists of a product owner, a development team, and a scrum master. The owner envisions the project, while the team follows through with it from beginning to end. Meanwhile, the scrum master provides leadership and acts as an authoritative figure for the development team.

Becoming Certified

For those that work within the product development game, becoming certified in scrum is a valuable asset to cultivate. Demand for this certification has only increased alongside the growing popularity of the Agile methodology. While receiving a scrum certification is quite the investment, it is a relatively quick process. Depending on if you're seeking a junior or senior level course, it can take anywhere from hours to days to complete. Those that become certified in scrum are usually scrum masters. Scrum masters are tasked with inspiring, enabling, and guiding their teams through the process of product development. They also facilitate collaboration and productivity from the team and resolve any issues that may impede the unit’s progress.   It's important to note that scrum is not only used in agile software development. It can be immensely helpful when it comes to managing projects in an array of other fields as well. Before you enroll in a scrum certification course, be sure to properly evaluate the accreditation. This ensures that the class is from a credible organization that your employer respects and values. At Number8, our philosophy is to empower our clients to produce better software, faster. We are experts in augmenting scrum teams with senior consultants that can help increase team velocity immediately. If you’re interested in learning more about Number8 and what we do, give us a call at (502) 890-7665, or check out our information page.

Explaining the Agile Process and the Transition to an Agile Scrum Environment

agile scrumMaking the move from waterfall to an agile scrum development environment can be a big move, but for many software teams, it’s definitely worth the transition. When you work in an environment that utilizes the scrum methodology, it’s likely this organization values open communication, collaboration and efficiency. While we’ve already explored the basics of agile scrum in previous blog posts, we haven’t delved into the actual format of agile scrum meetings. Depending on team preferences and styles, these meetings typically take on different forms and timelines, but they all include certain characteristics of the scrum methodology. First let’s meet the “typical” agile scrum team. These are the actual people involved and engaged throughout this process. It all begins with the “Product Owner” and his or her vision for the project. Next we have the “Scrum Development Team.” This group of cross-functional members works together in a self-organizing, collective atmosphere. The “Scrum Master” is more of the team manager, providing an important type of leadershipo inside the group. The job of the Scrum Master revolves around facilitating and resolving any issues experienced throughout the entire product development process.

The Agile Process and Different Types of Agile Scrum Meetings

Now that we've provided a basic understanding of the team and scrum qualities, it is time to move on to the actual agile scrum process. Agile software development is often described as an incremental development process. This process becomes more of a cycle in terms of movement. If there is an issue or a setback, the process might move backward to resolve such issues. This cyclical process allows the project to easily continue forward as well. This is where the agility of this method becomes vital. But for more of a visual, the scrum process begins with the sprint planning meeting and proceeds from there. Here is an overview of the different types of scrum meetings:

Sprint Planning Meeting:

This meeting begins with the Product Owner. This is where he or she explains her vision for the project as well as ways for the team to meet this goal. During this meeting, team members decide the amount of work they can complete in a timely manner. This is also when the team moves work from the Product Backlog to the Sprint Backlog. This step requires a lot of planning and usually this takes around 8 hours for the group to decide on a finalized 30-day Sprint.

Daily Scrum and Sprint Execution:

From the planning meeting, we move into the daily scrum meetings. Every single day for about 30 minutes, the team gathers together to report any issues or progress on their tasks. Though brief, this meeting is an essential part of the scrum process. It is designed to keep all group members on track in a cohesive manner. Normally the Product Owner is present during all daily scrum meetings to assist in any way.

Sprint Review Meeting:

This meeting is used to showcase a live demonstration of the work completed. During the sprint review meeting the Product Owner, Scrum Master and stakeholders are present. They review the product and suggest changes or improvements.

Sprint Retrospective Meeting:

This meeting is held to facilitate a team’s reflection on their progress. The team speaks openly about their organizational concerns and teamwork. During this meeting, dialogue should remain friendly, non-judgmental and impartial. This review session is a key part of team building and development and it’s also very important for future scrum projects.

Backlog Refinement Meeting:

The last type of scrum meeting reviewed in this article is the backlog refinement meeting. Team members focus on the quality and skill work involved during sprints. This meeting is necessary for the business owners to connect with the development team and is used to assess the quality and development of the final product. This meeting involves important reflection on the team backlogs. These backlogs are often written in User Story form and specify what makes the product useful to the consumer. Scrum meetings involve so much more than the brief descriptions provided above. There are many additional pieces to the scrum process including things like burndown charts and scaling, but the point of this post is to provide an overview of different kinds of scrum meetings. Regardless of the type, all scrum meetings encourage organization, progress and resolutions. With this incremental and cyclical software development process, all members have the ability to communicate openly and honestly. With the process of scrum and the sprint timeline, projects are more efficiently completed with the help of a capable and cooperative team and Product Owner led by a skillful Scrum Master. Whether you are already using an agile approach to software development, or are considering transitioning towards a more agile methodology, the senior level agile developers at Number8 can help you make the shift. For additional details about working with a Number8 software developer, give us a call or contact us via email.

Kanban Versus Scrum in Agile Software Development

Kanban versus Scrum in Agile MethodologyThere are always new and different ways of software development. To stay relevant and efficient, it's important for software developers to be informed about all the different varieties. The Agile Method of software development is widely accepted across teams. However, there are different processes within the Agile Method that are more or less appropriate for different projects. Below we break down the main differences between two popular forms of Agile: Kanban versus Scrum.

Agile Method

The basis of agile software development is that it can adapt over the course of a project. Instead of in-depth planning at the beginning of a project, agile methodologies allow for feedback and change. There are 12 core principles of the Agile Method that reiterate the idea of flexibility including:

Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer’s competitive advantage

Working software is the primary measure of progress

At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly

The main focus of agile is to produce a well-functioning product. So, in order to get there, companies enforce frequent face-to-face communication, teamwork, and accountability. Within the realm of the agile method, there are other varieties of software development including Kanban and Scrum. You should choose between the methods depending on what kind of software that your team is working on at the time.

Kanban

Inspired by the Toyota Production System and Lean Manufacturing, the Kanban method follows visual queues to frame the development processes. The processes are adjusted based on what to produce, when to produce, and how much to produce. Kanban promotes small scale changes to already implemented processes so that developers can overlay the method on top of established workflows.    As the Kanban blog explains: “Kanban is a technique for managing a software development process in a highly efficient way.”

Scrum

One of the most popular frameworks for the Agile Method, Scrum manages complicated software development. The method follows a set of rules that never change, including the roles of developers and the processes they use. These processes include “sprints.” Sprints are fixed-length iterations that usually span from one-two weeks. This structure allows for accountability, project visibility, and flexibility.

Kanban Versus Scrum

Both Kanban and Scrum help to simplify difficult developmental processes by breaking them down into smaller, more comprehensible parts. But, each method has its positives and negatives. Scrum is more rigid than Kanban. Scrum requires teams to adopt a completely new way of developing software. Everyone will have to learn about the ceremonies, specific roles, and the iterations. Whereas with Kanban, teams will more or less be able to follow the same framework they are accustomed to. When it comes down to it, there is no real winner in the fight Kanban versus Scrum. It all depends on your team and the project you’re working on. Both methods are efficient and successful and it should be up to you to decide which you enjoy implementing more. At Number8, we all work to stay on top of the latest news in software development. Because we follow the agile method, we deliver top quality products. To learn more about the methods that we use, read our informational page here. And give us a call today at (502) 890-7665 for help with your latest project!

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