costa rica's sustainability

Costa Rica’s Sustainability Initiatives

Costa Rica is a designated blue zone. This means it’s an area of the world which is residence to some of the longest living people on earth. People who live in certain regions of Costa Rica live beyond the world’s average life span. This is in thanks to resources in the area and the emphasis on community in day-to-day life. To preserve the blue zone status the area has received, Costa Rica’s sustainability initiatives are becoming a long list of goals to achieve over the next decade. These initiatives will help to ensure the region preserves its natural beauty, maintains its blue zone status, and continues to set an example on sustainability for other countries to follow.

Sustainability has been a huge buzz-word on the Internet for years. With recent reports on climate change, it is becoming a phrase that is heard more and more often. In order for our world to stay habitable, countries need to take major steps to reduce their carbon emissions. It is also crucial for countries to maintain their area’s ecological welfare. And Costa Rica is leading the race when it comes to setting sustainability initiatives and meeting them. Over 10 years ago, the country announced a plan to ban single-use plastics by 2021. The country also heavily relies on reusable energy and, after investing in wind and solar power, Costa Rica is mostly carbon neutral.

Costa Rica’s Sustainability Initiatives Through the Next Decade

Costa Rica’s sustainability initiatives moving forward include going completely carbon neutral by 2025. With the country on track to ban single-use plastics by a set goal date, Costa Rica is hoping to achieve carbon neutrality soon after. Currently, the country can run for up to a quarter of a year on renewable sources. However, their transportation still depends on fossil fuels. Over the next 7 years, they plan to become completely carbon neutral. In doing so, will become the first ever completely carbon neutral nation in the world.

Saving Wildlife & The Planet

Costa Rica’s sustainability initiatives are set to save the area of the planet the country occupies in addition to going completely carbon neutral. Five years ago, in 2012, the country banned sport hunting through a unanimous vote. Costa Rica is the first country in Central America to take this initiative toward preserving wildlife. This law came to fruition due to the number of tourists visiting to hunt trophy animals including jaguars, pumas, and parrots. Anyone caught violating this law will be hit with a $3,000 fine or sentenced to four months in jail; however, the local population is still allowed to hunt and fish as their lives often depend on it.


The country’s attempt to protect its wildlife and the lands they live on extends past shore and into the ocean.

 In the last quarter of a century, Costa Rica has been able to double the amount of forest cover in the country while also tripling its GDP. And 7 years ago, in 2011, the country created the Seamounts Marine Management Area to protect marine life surrounding Costa Rica. This oceanic management area is larger than the United State’s Yellowstone National park which covers 2,219,791 acres. It is the second largest marine protected area in the world after the Galapagos Islands.

Costa Rica is a country where the residents are happy, healthy, and the government is working to preserve that. It is second to Switzerland in a list of the “greenest” countries in the world. Costa Rica has also topped the global list of countries ranked by happiness three times in recent studies. The sustainability initiatives the country has set to carry it through the next decade will only better the country and its 4.9 million citizens as a whole. Costa Rica hopes to clear the path for other countries to follow in its footsteps before it’s too late.